How Chef Nyesha Arrington Makes “Shatter Batter” Chicken Tenders

The chef shares her tips for making homemade chicken tenders with super crispy batter for the ultimate crunch

“Everyone loves a chicken tender, yet some people might think it’s basic,” says chef and Plateworthy host Nyesha Arrington. “It’s not actually. It’s really complicated.”

She begins the complex process by breaking down the chicken to show where the actual tender can be found. Next, she brines the chicken in buttermilk with a little bit of salt and sugar for about 20 minutes. After the meat is prepared, chef Arrington walks us through the ingredients and techniques she uses to make her “shatter batter,” a super crunchy coating that will make and keep these tenders crispy.

After dredging the chicken in flour and the batter, she drops the tenders in hot oil, not once, but twice, to ensure the inside is cooked, and the outside is extra crispy, but not burnt. After plating her chicken, she takes an audibly crunchy bite.

“That is what you want when you eat a chicken tender: cr-unch!” she says emphatically. “That buttermilk brine goes all the way through. It’s exciting my entire pallet. And those spices shine… It just encapsulates all of your tastebuds”

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How Chef Nyesha Arrington Makes “Shatter Batter” Chicken Tenders

The chef shares her tips for making homemade chicken tenders with super crispy batter for the ultimate crunch

“Everyone loves a chicken tender, yet some people might think it’s basic,” says chef and Plateworthy host Nyesha Arrington. “It’s not actually. It’s really complicated.”

She begins the complex process by breaking down the chicken to show where the actual tender can be found. Next, she brines the chicken in buttermilk with a little bit of salt and sugar for about 20 minutes. After the meat is prepared, chef Arrington walks us through the ingredients and techniques she uses to make her “shatter batter,” a super crunchy coating that will make and keep these tenders crispy.

After dredging the chicken in flour and the batter, she drops the tenders in hot oil, not once, but twice, to ensure the inside is cooked, and the outside is extra crispy, but not burnt. After plating her chicken, she takes an audibly crunchy bite.

“That is what you want when you eat a chicken tender: cr-unch!” she says emphatically. “That buttermilk brine goes all the way through. It’s exciting my entire pallet. And those spices shine… It just encapsulates all of your tastebuds”

Read More

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *